Pattern of the Month - Reviewer Round Up, The Pippi Pinafore

Wednesday, August 22, 2018
Oh, hello blog! Long time no see...

I've been a bit sick lately, which has meant my blogging and instagram time have been pretty much non-existent. But I'm on the mend now so you'll hopefully be seeing a little more of me from now on.
The Pippi Pinafore was the latest pattern to be included in my Reviewer Series. The aim is to have people of all different shapes and sizes, backgrounds and skill levels, try one of my patterns and then write about it. There is no requirement to gush about a pattern and I encourage Reviewers to be honest about what they really think of the pattern (and to include information about any changes they made).

There are so many lovely Pippi's to look at today, but make sure you head over to read (or watch!) their reviews to find out what they really think...


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -









I'm not going to lie, I just about fell off my chair when I saw Valerie's version of Pippi. (Well, I would have if I wasn't sitting on the couch...). 

Valerie made a size 22 bib and graded out to a 24 waist for the skirt and my goodness, the lady's got style. Made out of a pretty green corduroy (with pink cats embroidered on it no less!) and paired with a 3/4 sleeve fitted knit top, I think Valerie is definitely cool weather ready.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -








Charlene made the ultimate summery Pippi with floral printed denim. I keep looking at all the floral denims in my local fabric shop and never take the plunge, but with summer around the corner here, and inspired by Charlene, I think I'm going to! 

And you'd never believe that this was Charlene's first time with buttonholes, button facings and jean buttons. Did you see that last photo? I couldn't have done it better myself.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -






Jessica describes herself as a classic pear shape and ended up grading her Pippi over 3 sizes, and what a great job she did! It's not easy blending multiple sizes in one pattern.

With her Pippi made in a lovely blue wool, and paired with a mustard cardigan and an extra 2 inches of skirt length, I think Jessica is ready for some chilly weather.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -




A favourite trick of mine is to keep any lightweight fabric scraps and use them for pocket bags or linings. The prettier and louder the print, the better! Amanda did the same thing with Pippi, making the linings of her pockets, bib and waistband out of a pretty patterned shirting cotton that she had left over.

Also, if you have a bit of an aversion to buttonholes, then you can take a leaf out of Amanda's book and use snap buttons instead! Using a bronzed snap button gives you the look of a denim/jean button without any of the hassle of inserting buttonholes, and they look great.

Oh, and if you have short torso, you may want to shorten the length of the straps, as Amanda found out...


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -




Alexa used a great technique to transfer her pattern markings to her fabric using carbon paper, saving her having to cut her original pattern and therefore keeping it intact so that she can use other sizes in the future. I tend to trace over my patterns using Swedish tracing paper OR cheap lightweight, sew-in interfacing, but if you have access to dressmaker's carbon paper, I highly recommend giving it a go!

Oh, and if you're also struggling to find the section to sew up the waistband sides, I promise it's there! Page 12, step 3 of the Attaching Waistband to Skirt section :)


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -






Lillia made her Pippi out of a gorgeous thick check-print fabric with a little bit of stretch (that she got in NZ, I might add!). Cutting a straight 24 C cup I think you'll agree that the fit is pretty much spot on.

Because Lillia is a bit shorter than the pattern is drafted for, she shortened the bib by 3cm as well as the skirt by 6cm. I'm looking forward to seeing Lillia's next version with back patch pockets — such a great idea!


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -





Tracey used a lightweight fabric (cotton/linen blend) to make up her Pippi, proving that Pippi can be worn year round depending on where you live and what you choose to make your pinafore out of.

Another one to pair her Pippi with a 3/4 fitted knit top,  I think must be the styling of choice for Pippi wearer's!


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -






I love the choice of fabrics both ladies made their Pippis from. Pippi is a really versatile pattern for making out of any number of fabrics. Nikki chose a striped linen for a summery version (and Rachel used a red denim) but as they mention in their review, upping the fabric weight and choosing a fabric content with wool etc, and then layering long sleeves underneath can give you a perfect winter Pippi.

They also discuss the different cup sizes available as well as the size they chose and why (at around 3.10 in), so if you're wanting to hear more about their thoughts on choosing a Pippi size that's right for you, make sure you watch that section.

Oh, and check out Rachel's amazing charity shop find — vintage anchor buttons! They are stunning!


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -







I think Meg is right when she mentions how flattering Pippi is from the side. I totally agree (and as she also mentioned, this is probably more unusual for most garments!!).

Meg made her Pippi from a linen for the Northern Hemisphere summer and then used an acetate for the lining.

Meg tells me she's still on the fence about whether she's a pinafore person, but what do you think? I'm obviously very biased, but I think it looks great :)


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -








Kristi totally has the funky lining bit down (just like Amanda!). All business on the outside, par-tay on the inside.

It's little details like these that always make me smile when I put a handmade garment on, and with that bright blue (and those cute sunglasses) I think Kristi might feel the same way.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -






Well, if this isn't just a little piece of summer-time in the depths of winter (albeit an Australian winter for Jane) then I don't know what is! Jane actually purchased Pippi when it was first released, but was kind enough to let me include her beautiful creation in this round up.

Jane's fabric is a cotton canvas — I think the silhouette suits a heavier fabric like canvas, duck or drill perfectly. And we can't not mention the very impressive pocket pattern matching! You'd never know there were pockets there if they weren't in use!


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -








It's a double JLH look for Siona, pairing a pretty Gable top with a subtle pink Pippi. Siona made a straight 12D which fit straight out of the packet, which always makes me happy. No more flat pattern bust adjustments - yay!

You may have noticed that Siona's pleats are facing inwards. It was an accident on her part but I really like it this way as well and it's something that you can totally do on purpose!


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -








Kristina and I are part of the rare and exclusive club of people who actually like sitting down and taping print-at-home patterns together. I find it quite relaxing and a bit meditative if I'm honest. It's one of those tasks where you can just tune out and be with your thoughts.

Plus, not to toot my own horn or anything... but I do try to make this an easy task, breaking individual pattern pieces up where it makes sense to do so.

Anyway! Kristina wasn't entirely convinced that she could pull off a pinny since she was no longer at school (I'm not either... but I was never subject to a pinafore school uniform) but I think we can all agree that Pippi is a little bit different. With the shaping included at the bust and waist, Kristina shows there's a wide scope for all shapes, sizes and ages to wear Pippi, and she pulls it off beautifully!


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -





Charlotte made her Pippi from a vintage cotton lawn. I've never tried a fabric that light to make Pippi, but Charlotte's version is so pretty and ended up being the perfect garment for balmy summer days.

I'm glad so many people have mentioned the pockets, and Charlotte is no exception, noting that they're a perfect size for your phone. (And I think Siona went as far as adding a chocolate bar and a small bottle of wine?)


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -







Isabelle ended up making 2 versions of Pippi. The first was the red muslin, which ended up a little too big in the bib. Izzy and I worked through the size issue and realised that sizing down in the bib would be a better fit, which lead to the second version, the green/grey linen.

Overall (s'cuse the pun), sizing down in the bib while still grading out to the bigger skirt size worked really well. If you are in between sizes, or you're not sure which size to choose because of the style of the bib, sizing down is always an option. Check out the included finished garment measurements and give me an email if you need more guidance.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -





I adore the fabric Claire chose for her Pippi!  Claire fits into my size 24 (the largest size I have available) but added an extra 4 inches to the waistband, since Pippi only has 1.5" of ease at the waist and Claire wanted a tiny bit more.

Also, you can't quite see it well, but Claire is another one to line her handmades in bright, colourful fabric.

Oh, and Claire is also part of the 'love to put PDF patterns together' club. Anyone else care to join?


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


So, there you have it, a lovely selection of Pippi's made with a range of fabrics and on lots of different bodies. 

Make sure you click the title of each review to head over and read a bit more in depth about each makers experiences making Pippi, anything they would change and if they have any special tips for when you're making your own Pippi.

xx
J
Shop Patterns     .     Instagram     .     Newsletter      .     Facebook    .     Pinterest    .    Podcast
Post Comment
Post a Comment

Thank you so much for stopping by to leave me a comment, like most people, I really do appreciate them all!

Due to the large amount of spam I seem to be receiving for some strange reason, comments may take longer to be published than usual. Apologies!

XX
Jen

Auto Post Signature

Auto Post  Signature