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The Gable Top Tutorial Series...

Friday, August 19, 2016

Hello Everyone!

I'm excited to get underway with some tutorials to inspire you while you're making your next Gable Top. I've been seeing some beautiful ones popping up around the internet lately (you can see some of them here), so if you've made one, let me know!

If you have anything specific you'd like covered, please send me an email or leave me a comment, otherwise below is what we'll be covering over the coming weeks -

  • A retro 3/4 sleeve Gable Top Hack
  • Suitable fabrics for your Gable Top
  • Sewing with knits on your sewing machine
  • Adjusting the Gable Top neckline
  • Adding Elbow Patches onto Long Sleeves (with free pattern piece!)

Talk soon,

xx
J

Introducing The Gable Top - A Knit Top Sewing Pattern

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

With a classic 50s-inspired true slash neckline, a long-line body for extra comfort and three different sleeve options, The Gable Top will become your new favourite go-to knit top pattern.

Gable is perfect for wearing all year round – layered with dresses and cardigans on chilly mornings or worn on its own with 3/4 skinny jeans or a high waisted skirt à la Audrey in spring. Gable is a stylish weekend basic that can be easily dressed up and added to your office outfit rotation.

Made with comfy stretch knits, Gable is a quick and easy sew that doesn't use much fabric and turns out perfectly every time. A modern take on a timeless and elegant basic.


The idea for Gable has been floating around in my head for a long time. I love knit tops and since releasing Bronte all that time ago, I knew I needed to revisit the world of knits again. They're so easy, so quick and so satisfying to make and wear.

Gable is a true slash-neckline top, which basically means it sits at a 90-degree angle straight across the neckline from the inner shoulders. If you love the style, but aren't a fan of necklines sitting up so high, don't worry, I talk about how to alter the height of the neckline in the pattern instructions and will be doing a little tutorial for you as well.

Speaking of tutorials, I'll be popping a few up on the ol' blog over the coming weeks – want an even more retro-style Gable? I'll show you how to alter the pattern for 3/4 sleeves (it's a super easy adjustment!).  Not sure about sewing with knits? I have lots of in-depth posts already about knit fabrics and sewing them on your sewing machine (as I did with all of my Gable tops!) but I'll be writing a bit more about the process so that you can feel relaxed knowing that you'll come out with a beautiful garment at the end.


Gable is really quick to make, for both newbies and advanced seamstresses alike. Plus, she's elegant as heck you guys! You can't put one on and not feel a little like you tried to look nice that day (even though you really didn't because there are crumbs all over the floor, you have greasy hair and it's freezing outside so it's a pj bottom and slippers kinda day). I have a black one that I wear all the time; in fact, I went out on Saturday night for the first time since before Oscar was born (for a crazy wild night of dessert with a lovely bunch of ladies) and it was a perfect choice with a wool Felicity skirt and the freezing temperatures of the weekend (we've had snow! And more is forecast for the end of the week).

If you have any questions or anything specific you'd like covered in a tutorial, do let me know. Otherwise, I can't wait to see your Gable tops!

xx
J

PS) Making all of my samples from stripes was a complete accident, but I may also have made a black and cream striped one and a red and white long sleeve striped one as well. Oops...

New Sewing Pattern Coming Soon - The Gable Top

Friday, July 29, 2016

I've been a bit MIA, mostly because I've been putting the finishing touches on my next pattern, The Gable Top, which is coming soon...


Gable is a modern take on an elegant classic 50's design - with 3 seasonal variations suitable for all seasons and made with comfy knits, Gable is a beautiful and quick project, that'll become your new go-to knit top pattern.

See you soon!

xx
J

Delicate Rolled Hems, Without a specialty Foot

Saturday, July 16, 2016

Just like any hobby, sewing can become an expensive pass-time with all of the different bits and bobs available - whether you're a newbie (what do I actually need?) to an experienced sewer (must have all-the-new gadgets!!).

I might be in the minority here, but I think that the fewer fancy gadgets you have, the better. Yes, you might save a few minutes on a specialty technique with that fancy foot, but you still have to learn how to use the foot AND it's only worth it if you use that particular technique a lot. Almost everything can be done with the basic equipment that came with your sewing machine and yet, almost every technique has it's own specialty thing to 'make it easier and faster'.

So, if you're on a budget or are still exploring whether sewing is for you, here is a little technique that will give you perfect rolled hems every time, without the need for a rolled hem foot. There are a few more steps involved, but you only need your straight stitch foot and an extra 5 minutes for a lovely little rolled hem - it's easier than you think it is.

You'll Need - 


Steps - 

1. Place a line of stitching 6mm (or 1/4") in from the raw edge, all the way around the hem of your Hunter Tank (or other sewing project), starting from one tie end and finishing at the other tie end.


2. Press your hem up to the wrong side along your stitched line, making sure your stitches are just visible on the wrong side. For the Hunter Tank, you'll need to gently ease up the side seams.


3. Secure your pressed fold by placing a line of stitching as closely to the pressed edge as you can. You'll probably be stitching on or very near to your initial set of stitches.


This is what it'll look like on the right side...

4. Trim out your excess fabric, as close to your stitched line as possible.


5. Press your hem up again one more time so that your rows of stitching are to the underside, easing around your side seam one more time.


6. Stitch in place with your machine or using hand stitches and you'll now have a neat little rolled hem. No specialty feet needed.


Of course, you are more than welcome to use a rolled hem foot if you have one, but you'll still get a lovely result either way.

Do you have specialty feet that you hardly ever use? Have you tried this technique to get a rolled hem? I'd love to know how it worked out for you, let me know in the comments!

xx
J

This tutorial is part of The Hunter Tank Sewing Series

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The Longest Night...

Sunday, July 10, 2016
  






I know I'm a bit late to the party, but you guys, it's July already. The shortest day has come and gone and summer is apparently on it's way (if you believe the hype that is. I, personally, am skeptical). It's been sickness and busy-ness and cold around here.

I was reading an article the other day that was talking about the winter solstice - it marks the very centre of the seasons, where the sun goes away to hide for the longest night, and I thought to myself, what a lovely way to think of it. Instead of it being the shortest day, it is instead, The Longest Night.

Now, doesn't that sound cosy? It sounds like the name of the softest inky-blue ball of wool you ever did see. Like the cosiest of nights, tucked up in front of the fire. Like the cold-crispness of a dark and clear winter night with all of the twinkling stars looking down from above.

It's a nice change of perspective. A glass half-full of warm milk with a side of freshly baked cookie. And sometimes, a warm glass of milk, the longest night and a bit of perspective is just what the doctor ordered. Time to breath and re-think.

I've been busy working on new patterns. Two of them. They'll be released at the same time, separately as well as in a bundle, and it's been keeping me pretty busy. But I did find time to finally finish my very first ever roman blind the other weekend. It only took me 2.5 years, and I still have 3 more to go, plus curtains for my sewing room. But all of those combined should only take another 2 years... especially now that I know what I'm doing *wink*.

Stay warm,

xx
J

Perfect French Seams - The Hunter Tank Sewing Series

Friday, July 8, 2016

I love French Seams and though I did a tutorial a few years ago, I thought since releasing The Hunter Tank, that it was the perfect time for a bit of a re-fresh.

The Hunter Tank can be almost completely made up with French Seams (except for the centre front) and it's the perfect little pattern to try the technique on if you're new to it.

French Seams are the best kind of seam to use on delicate, light and sheer fabrics, just what The Hunter Tank calls for.  They enclose the raw edge of a seam and produce a beautiful finish on the inside and out, and they aren't hard at all! Let me show you...

You'll need - 


Steps - 

1. Wrong sides together, place a line of stitching 5mm (or 1/4") away from the seam allowance.



2. Press your seam allowances open (use a Tailor's Ham to keep the light angles on the centre back seam of your Hunter Tank in place).


3. Fold your seam in half, right sides together, along your stitched edge and press.


4. Place a line of stitching along the seam allowance again, this time 10mm (3/8") away from the edge. Press and marvel at your beautiful finished French Seam.


Ahhhh, look at how pretty that is, and so easy to boot! You can do a French Seam with any amount of seam allowance really, just make sure both seams equal the seam allowance that your pattern calls for (15mm for Hunter). And make sure your first seam is smaller than the second seam, or trim your first seam down before stitching in your second seam.

French seams can be used on The Hunter Tank for the back centre seam, side seams and shoulder seams.

Have you tried French Seams? Will you give them a go now that you know how easy they are?

xx
J

Perfecting the Centre Seam - The Hunter Tank Sewing Series

Friday, July 1, 2016
Welcome to the first of The Hunter Tank Sewing Tutorial Series. Today we're going to be looking at getting the perfect centre seam. It's pretty straight forward really, but let's get started shall we?

You'll need - 
The Hunter Tank sewing pattern
Your sewing machine

Steps -
1. Sew your centre front seam together, right sides facing. Press your seam open.

2. Because there is a 2cm seam allowance included in this particular seam, place a set of basting stitches all the way down the middle of the seam allowance by stitching 1cm (3/8") away from the raw edge, providing you with a guide line for the next stage.

Do this to both sides of this seam allowance.


3. Using your basting stitches as a guide, press your seam allowance in half and tuck your raw edge under.

Because of the light curves in this seam on the Hunter Tank, I like to press it using a Tailor's Ham to help keep the subtle shaping.

4. Press, then secure with a line of stitching as close to the edge as you can get it. Press again and voila, a perfect centre seam every time.


Why not try some contrast stitching down your centre seam next time you're making a Hunter Tank? Have you tried this?

xx
J

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